American Councils for International EducationWashington, D.C., June 1, 2016 – Wael Ahmed from Egypt has been awarded a fellowship from the U.S. Department of State to participate in the 2016 Teachers of Critical Languages Program (TCLP). He will teach Arabic for a full academic year at Anne Chesnutt Middle School in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Anne Chesnutt Middle School has participated in a nation-wide competition in order to host a TCLP teacher and Wael Ahmed is one of a total of 24 teachers who have been selected from China and Egypt for participation in TCLP.

TCLP is designed to increase the study and acquisition of important world languages in U.S. schools. This program enables primary and secondary schools to strengthen their teaching of critical languages by bringing Egyptian and Chinese teachers to the U.S. to teach Arabic and Chinese language for an academic year. Launched in 2006, TCLP has provided fellowships to over 200 primary and secondary school teachers of English from Egypt and China to teach in K-12 schools throughout the United States.

In addition to teaching their native languages, TCLP exchange teachers expand the understanding of the world in their U.S. host communities by establishing strong ties with teachers, students, parents and members of community, and by sharing information about their home countries and cultures. At the same time, teachers gain first-hand knowledge of the United States to share with students and fellow teachers in their home countries. Upon return, many of them establish lasting bonds between their U.S. host schools and their home schools in Egypt and China.

TCLP is funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, which promotes international mutual understanding through a wide range of academic, cultural, private-sector, professional and sports exchange programs. These exchanges engage youth, students, educators, artists, athletes and emerging leaders in the United States and in more than 160 countries. Alumni of ECA exchanges comprise over one million people around the world, including more than 50 Nobel Laureates and more than 350 current or former heads of state and government.

TCLP is implemented by American Councils for International Education: ACTR/ACCELS, an international nonprofit organization that prepares individuals and institutions to succeed in an increasingly interconnected world. Since 1974, American Councils has responded to the needs of the communities where it works with hundreds of robust, international education programs that include academic exchanges, language immersion, testing and assessment, professional training, community development, and scholarly research.

Media Contact: Zara Hovhannisyan, Senior Program Manager: zhovhannisyan@americancouncils.org 202.833.7522

Used with permission.

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 8, 2016

        


George Brooks accepts award.The North Carolina Association of Career and Technical Education, Business Division announced at the 2016 CTE Annual Summer Conference, this year’s Teacher of the Year Award winner is George E. Brooks. The Teacher of the Year Award is given in recognition of being selected as the NCACTE-BE Teacher of the Year.

The 2015-2016 NCACTE-BE Teacher of the Year Award winner George Brooks, has received a B.S. in Business Administration from Methodist University and later his Business Education Teaching Certification from Fayetteville State University. He is currently pursuing a Master’s of Science in Vocational Education in Information Technologies at East Carolina University.  He began his teaching career at South View High School in Hope Mills has been inspiring to his students, staff and peers at South View High School for the past 20 years.

Mr. Brooks has been an active member of the state organization for past 17 years.  He has served as a member and chair of the Professional Development Committee and Resolutions Committee at the state level. Within the Business Division, he has served as the Committee Chairperson for the Professional Development Committee and Resolutions over the past several years. He was elected as the Business Division President-Elect, The Division President, and The Division Past President.

Mr. Brooks has given several teacher workshops, at both county teacher in-service meetings, as well as state and regional ACTE meetings to help teachers improve their technological skills with both teachers required computer programs, and programs to assist student learning. He is energetic and takes the initiative to promote NCACTE and ACTE at all meetings with peers and colleagues.

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 8, 2016

        


Scholarship UpdateEach year the CCS’ High School Counselors work diligently to let their students know about scholarship and grant opportunities that will help pay for college and post-secondary needs.  The Class of 2016 went above and beyond and earned a total of $74,605,708.53.  Of the 74 millions dollars, 10 million was affiliated with military scholarships, 9 million was affiliated with athletics, and 50.1 million was awarded for academic accomplishments and achievements.  These numbers alone show just how talented and well rounded our Cumberland County students are.
 
As we get ready for the 2016-2017 school year to begin, the Class of 2017 will begin their journey of college applications and scholarship searching once again with the help of their school counselors.  Students can start their search at the Consolidated College Fair on October 4th at the Crown Expo Center and as well as apply for the FAFSA in October.  Overall, the CCS’ School Counselors and the Counselor Coordinator wish them of the best of luck during these exciting times.
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Published by Laurie Pender on August 8, 2016

        


Center for Disease Control's (CDC) LogoYour children may have heard about the Zika virus disease (Zika) outbreak and may have questions about it. Children can better cope with any disease outbreak when they know more about what is happening and that they can do something to help protect themselves, family, and friends.

It’s important that children understand anyone living in or  traveling to an area with Zika may be at risk for getting sick. People who are not living in or traveling to an area with Zika are not likely to get Zika. There are steps we can take to prevent catching and spreading Zika. 

By tailoring your conversation to your child’s age, developmental stage, and concerns, you can help him or her understand and cope with the current Zika outbreak.

Information from Center for Disease Control (CDC) about Zika

Zika Virus – CDC Respuesta SPANISH

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 4, 2016

        


Raleigh –  Twenty-two Chinese Guest Teachers today were paired with schools in 11 North Carolina school districts to provide expanded Chinese language and culture course offerings to students in elementary, middle and high schools during the upcoming school year. The CCS welcomes Chen Xujie to Anne Chesnutt Middle SchoolJin Meng to Seventy-First High School, and Xiong Yuanhuai to New Century International Middle School!

The Guest Teachers are provided through Go Global NC (formerly the Center for International Understanding), in partnership with the NC Department of Public Instruction (DPI), College Board,  and Hanban, an organization affiliated with the Chinese Ministry of Education. This is the sixth straight year that Go Global NC has welcomed a team of teachers from China to provide authentic language learning in North Carolina schools. Read more . . .

News Release – 22 Chinese Guest Teachers Join NC School Communities (Aug 3 ’16)

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 3, 2016

        


Johns Hopkins Center for Talented YouthFayetteville – Dr. Tonia Bonner, a science teacher at Alger B. Wilkins High School, is serving as an instructor for the John Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY) this summer. CTY provides challenging three-week summer programs to academically advanced students from around the world, as well as online and family programs.

Dr. Bonner is teaching Fast-Paced High School Chemistry at CTY’s site at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA., one of 25 CTY Summer Programs sites in the United States and Hong Kong. In the course, students learn the equivalent of one year of high school chemistry in three weeks.

CTY offers more than 100 Summer Programs courses ranging from Ancient Greek and Introduction to the Biomedical Sciences to Advanced Fiction and Principles of Engineering Design. This year, CTY Summer Programs were held from June 26 – July 15 and July 17 – August 5.

Last year, CTY Summer Programs had nearly 10,000 enrollments. In order to qualify to take CTY courses, a student must participate in a talent search by taking and scoring well on such above-grade level tests as the SAT and ACT.

A global leader in gifted education since 1979, CTY is focused on recognizing academic talent in exceptional K-12 students and supporting their growth with courses, services, and resources specifically designed to meet their needs. CTY draws students from 50 states and 81 countries worldwide. In fiscal year 2015, CTY provided more than $5.8 million in financial aid to nearly 7,000 students.

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 3, 2016

        


Credit by Demonstrated MasteryThe Credit by Demonstrated Mastery (CDM) process allows current high school students to demonstrate mastery of a course’s content, getting credit and a “CDM” indicator on the student’s transcript by taking an assessment and completing an artifact. 

Any parents or students who are interested in CDM should complete the CDM application and return it to the AIG Consultant at their school no later than September 1, 2016.

*CDM also applies to 6-8 students, but only for certain high school courses offered at the school. Applications for middle school are not available until January.

 

CDM – Frequently Asked Questions

Credit by Demonstrated Mastery – Fall 2016 Application

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Published by Laurie Pender on August 2, 2016

        


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