Image of Amazing Acts of Character Nominees for January are Antonio Rojas, Surya Munogoti, Caleb Michael RogersThe Amazing Acts of Character Recognition Program celebrates Cumberland County Schools’ students who meritoriously display an act of good character that goes above and beyond expected pleasant behavior.  Beginning January 2017, each month, all nominees receive a certificate recognizing their act by the Counselor Coordinator.  In addition, a multidisciplinary Central Services Committee may recommend an elementary, middle and/or high school winner to the School Board, and the students are invited to attend the Board of Education meeting.

This month there were three students who were introduced to the board members and received a trophy.  

The January 2017 honorees are as follows:

Caleb-Michael Rogers, a seventh grader at New Century International Middle School (NCIMS)According to NCIMS Counselor Laura Moore, the 13 year old joined the wrestling team for the first time this year, and because of his positive attitude and work ethic, he has emerged as a leader on the team. She recalls at a recent home wrestling match observing Caleb make “a remarkably kind and respectful gesture.” One of Caleb’s teammates got pinned, was very upset, and refused to shake the hand of his opponent and the opponent’s coach, which is customary. “Caleb, without any word from his coaches, jumped up and went and shook the opponent’s and coach’s hands and congratulated them,” said Moore. “He truly showed great sportsmanship and represented his school very well. Caleb just instinctively knew what the right thing to do was and did it!”

Surya Munugoti, a junior at Terry Sanford High School (TSHS)Lola Widman, the school counselor at Max Abbott Middle, said that this 16 year old works as a tutor in a program where students in TSHS’ Global Studies Academy tutor students at her school in math or reading.  Widman said that Surya has “stood out from the outset for his outstanding performance.” She said that he genuinely cares about helping the students, works diligently to assist them, and checks to see if they are making progress in their math classes. According to Widman, each semester, tutors are only asked to volunteer twice a week for a set number of weeks. Surya has chosen to exceed the number of days per week and weeks than what is required. “He (Surya) has provided a great service to our students and to our school,” said Widman. “We are extremely fortunate and grateful for his help, especially considering the fact that he does not need the community service hours offered for this tutoring program. Instead, he is helping our students because he is intrinsically motivated to help others!”

Antonio Rojas, a junior at Douglas Byrd High School (DBHS) – DBHS Principal Dr. Zoletta Taylor is applauding this 17 year old’s level of compassion. Recently, Antonio wrestled an opponent from an area high school who had Down’s syndrome. According to Dr. Taylor, Antonio treated the match like any other and wrestled vigorously with his opponent; however, “because of his compassion for the student’s disability,” Antonio chose to take a personal loss to his wrestling record.

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Published by Bobbi Jo Pova on February 17, 2017

        


Image of 2017 Outstanding Educator Award Winners l-r Reames, Edwards, Anderson, Simmons and May - Feb 15 -2017Fayetteville – The Wells Fargo Outstanding Educator Award recognizes and helps foster excellence in education by presenting two teachers and one administrator in the Cumberland County Schools a $1,000 grant to implement a special educational project at their respective schools.

Greg Reames, Cape Fear Market President of Wells Fargo, presented this year’s awards and an engraved hand worked glass apple to the three educators during the Feb. 14 Cumberland County Board of Education meeting. The winners were as follows:
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Published by Laurie Pender on February 15, 2017

        


Renarta Clanton Moyd on the set of Get Connected with her guests Natasha Scott and Doug ParrishDuring February’s edition of Get Connected, CCS’ Chief Communications Officer Renarta C. Moyd is joined by CCS’ Executive Director of Student Services Natasha Scott and Douglas Parrish from the Cape Fear Valley Behavioral Health Care Center. They are discussing recognizing the signs and symptoms of suicide, getting help for those who may be suicidal, and the It’s OK 2 Ask suicide awareness campaign. To watch the show, tune in to FCE-TV – Cable Channel 5 on Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at noon or watch it now!
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Published by Laurie Pender on February 3, 2017

        


Image of text reading it's ok 2 ask about suicide.According to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, suicide is the third leading cause of death for North Carolinians between the ages of 10 to 24.  Unfortunately, stigma, myths, and misinformation about suicide prevent both adults and young people from discussing this topic.  Recognizing the signs and symptoms of suicide and knowing who to call for help is one way to prevent suicide.
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Published by Laurie Pender on February 2, 2017

        


Image celebrating National School Counselors Appreciation WeekFayetteville – National School Counseling Week, sponsored by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), will be celebrated from February 6–10, 2017, to focus public attention on the unique contribution of professional school counselors within U.S. school systems and how students are different as a result of what school counselors do. National School Counseling Week highlights the tremendous impact school counselors can have in helping students achieve school success and plan for a career.

“The special week honoring school counselors provides recognition to those who implement comprehensive school counseling programs, which are a vital part of the educational process for all students as they meet the challenges of the 21st Century,” said Cumberland County Schools’ Counseling Coordinator Kristy Curran.

In a proclamation signed by the Cumberland County Board of Education Chair, Curran cited school counselors for (1) being actively engaged in helping students examine their abilities, strengths, interests, and talents; (2) working in a partnership with parents as they encounter the challenges of rearing children in today’s world; (3) focusing on positive ways to enhance students’ social/personal, educational, and career development; and (4) working with teachers and other educators to provide an educational system where students can realize their potential and set healthy, realistic, and optimistic aspirations for themselves. Professional school counselors are certified, experienced educators with a master’s degree in guidance and counseling. The combination of their training and experience makes them an integral part of the total educational program.
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Published by Laurie Pender on January 30, 2017

        


Image of woman pushing shopping cart in the grocery store.Tip of the day from ChooseMyPlate.gov

Save time and money by planning your plate before you even leave for the grocery store. Check out MyPlate’s tips for shopping and meal prep. Start planning with these resources and learn more about meal planning made easy.

Check out the Wellness Tip of the Day!

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Published by Laurie Pender on January 26, 2017

        


Image of Chinese acrobat and dragon.Cumberland County Schools’ World Language Department presents its Chinese New Year Celebration. The event will be held on Thursday, February 23, 2017, from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. at Seventy-First High School located at 6764 Raeford Road/Fayetteville, NC. 

  •  There will be informational booths, games, and interactive activities from 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. for everyone to enjoy!
  • The public is invited.
  • For more details, send an e-mail to carmenvillalobos@ccs.k12.nc.us.
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Published by Laurie Pender on January 24, 2017

        


Image of stakeholders in the Carbon Bank Initiative preparing to plant trees.The Cumberland County Schools (CCS) was the host site for a recent Carbon Tree Bank Planting, the first ever!

Local students and representatives from the Air Quality Stakeholders of Cumberland County, Sustainable Sandhills, Urban Offsets, and the Fayetteville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization gathered on the front lawn of the CCS’ Educational Resource Center for the tree planting kickoff. In the coming weeks, more trees will be placed at Gallberry Farm and Sunnyside elementary schools.

According to organizers of the project, this effort will help remove about 26K tons of CO2 from the atmosphere over the lifetime of the trees, which is roughly equivalent to taking 6,000 cars off the road for one year! 
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Published by Laurie Pender on January 12, 2017

        


Image of students who were recently recognized for displaying Amazing Acts of Character. (From Left to Right: Maggie Kane, Hailey Blair, Jayden Townsend, Miranda Draughon)The Amazing Acts of Character Recognition Program celebrates Cumberland County Schools’ students who meritoriously display an act of good character that goes above and beyond expected pleasant behavior.  Beginning January 2017, each month, all nominees receive a certificate recognizing their act by the Counselor Coordinator.  In addition, a multidisciplinary Central Services Committee may recommend an elementary, middle and/or high school winner to the School Board, and the students are invited to attend the Board of Education meeting. This month there were four students who were introduced to the board members and received a trophy.  

The November 2016 honoree is as follows:

Hailey Blair, a sixth grader at Gray’s Creek Middle School (GCMS) – According to Patricia Brewer, Hailey’s English/Language Arts teacher, the 111-year-old is a “great person who is a good example for her peers.” Recently, Hailey received a graded paper from one of her teachers. Upon reviewing the graded paper, she noticed that her teacher had incorrectly scored it. The circled grade on the front of the paper was slightly higher than what it should have been. “Hailey respectfully brought this error to the attention of her teacher,” said Brewer. “Because of Hailey’s honesty and integrity in this situation, the teacher rewarded her by letting her keep those few extra points.”

The December 2016 honorees are as follows:

Margaret “Maggie” Kane, a third grader at Long Hill Elementary School – During Maggie’s recent participation in a St. Baldrick’s Foundation event, Mary Katherine Mouton, Maggie’s third-grade teacher said the eight-year-old “demonstrated courage, compassion, and empathy that is remarkable for anyone, much less an eight-year-old” According to Mouton, Maggie, who has a close relative that is a cancer survivor, decided two years ago to grow her hair and donate it to a child who has lost their hair because of cancer. Through the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, an organization dedicated to raising money and awareness for childhood cancer research, Maggie and her family sponsored a fundraising event at a local pizza restaurant. More than $10,000 was raised through the effort and “true to her word,” Maggie had her head shaved and donated her hair to Wigs for Kids. “Maggie is an inspiration and model for all of us!” said Mouton. “Thank you, Maggie!”

Miranda Draughon, a fourth grader at Gray’s Creek Elementary School – According to Kelly Tucker, the media coordinator at Miranda’s school, the 10-year-old is “a child with exceptional character.” During the Cumberland County Schools’ annual Reading Rocks! Walk-A-Thon for literacy effort, Miranda decided to take action by helping to buy books for the school media center. Tucker said she didn’t ask her parents for money or raid her piggy bank. Instead, Miranda enlisted the help of two friends from her church to help make bookmarks to sell at church. “As a result of her leadership, caring, and sense of responsibility, Miranda raised $28 for our library,” said Tucker.

Jayden Townsend, a fifth grader at Morganton Road Elementary School – Courtney Sides, the school counselor at Jayden’s school, said that the 10-year-old demonstrated an incredible amount of bravery and caring when recently, she saved her brother who was being viciously attacked by a dog. According to Sides, in November, Jayden, her mother, and little brother were visiting the home of friends in South Carolina. Jayden went outside to check on her brother when she noticed a dog [Rottweiler] on top of her brother. “She ran over, picked up the dog, and threw him,” said Sides. “Jayden picked up her brother and tried to get him into the house, but the dog attacked again.” She put her brother down and told him to run into the house while she fended off the dog. According to Sides, Jayden’s brother was hospitalized but has since returned to school. “She thought of her brother before herself,” said Sides. “She put herself in harm’s way to rescue him. It is not every day that you see someone help others, much less put themselves at risk. Through her heroic acts, she saved her little brother. We feel as though she should be recognized for her bravery and heroism.”

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Published by Laurie Pender on January 11, 2017

        


Image of the first recipients of the Champion for Children Award.At Board Members’ request, the Cumberland County Schools (CCS) invited Mrs. Porter and DJ Batise come and speak to all of our school staffs for the 2016-2017 kick off in August. Their story is one of how an educator can change a child’s life forever. In the Q & A part of the presentation, Mrs. Porter was asked how she was celebrated in her district for this work. Sadly, she was not. In Cumberland County Schools, we have those educators who make the difference every day. Dr. Till wanted to find a way to make certain that these educators are recognized and celebrated. He tasked the Innovation Council with the nomination, selection, and recognition process. The CCS was pleased to recognize the first honorees of the CCS’ Champion for Children Award at the January 10 School Board meeting.
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Published by Laurie Pender on January 11, 2017

        


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