National Diabetes Awareness Month
Published by Laurie Pender on November 7, 2018
.........................................................................................................................................

Nurse wearing purple gloves tests young boys blood sugar at schoolHistorically, the most common type of diabetes in children and teens was Type 1.  Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age but usually appears during childhood or adolescence. Also known as “juvenile onset diabetes.  Students with Type 1 diabetes require insulin daily. Due to lack of exercise, obesity, poor nutrition, family history and being a member of certain ethnic groups have contributed to the increased diagnoses of Type 2.  Our students with Type 2 diabetes produce insulin but have difficulty converting food into energy.

Common symptoms parents should monitor and consult with their primary care provider. 

  • Excessive thirst
  • Increased hunger
  • Blurred vision
  • Weight loss
  • Frequent urination
  • Bedwetting
  • Irritability
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Changes in behavior combined with other symptoms

Symptoms CCS Staff Monitors Closely 

Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar

  • Shaking
  • Sweating
  • Dizziness
  • Feeling anxious
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Hunger
  • Impaired vision
  • Weakness and fatigue 
  • Headache
  • Feeling irritable

Hyperglycemia or high blood sugar

  • Extreme thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Dry skin
  • Hunger
  • Blurred vision
  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased healing

Managing Diabetes at School
Students with diabetes can participate in all school activities including physical education, recess, and after-school activities.  Each school has three Diabetes Care Managers who are required to attend the annual Diabetes Awareness Professional Development. CCS staff follow the guidelines established by the student’s physician on the diabetes care plan. CCS School Nurses provide oversight and care plan overviews to ensure that all students with diabetes have a positive learning experience.

Parent/guardians are an intricate part of the student’s school health care team.  We are counting on you to:

  • Provide the school with an up to date Diabetes Care Plan after each visit
  • Provide diabetic supplies 
  • Be sure the school has fast acting carbohydrates for treating low blood sugars
  • Update parent/guardian contact information often

Our goal is to reduce absenteeism, decrease the incidence of emergency situations and provide students with a school setting conducive for successful health management and academic growth.