Office of Indian Education Holds 3rd Annual Dreamcatcher Leadership Institute
Published by Laurie Pender on June 30, 2017
.........................................................................................................................................

students watch demonstration during 3rd Annual Camp Dreamcatcher Leadership InstituteThe Office of Indian Education held its 3rd Annual Camp Dreamcatcher Leadership Institute on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP) the second week of June.  Twenty-Five students in grades 8-12 from across the county participated in the event.  

The camp’s purpose is multi-faceted. First and foremost it teaches American Indian and Alaskan Native students that college is an attainable goal and “dreams do come true”.

Students engage in purposeful and meaningful activities during their time on campus; they experience college life up-close and personal. Living on campus, dining in the dining hall, interacting with college professors, engaging with college students, learning about college admissions, removing and/or reducing the fear-factor associated with leaving home and embracing one’s native culture is an integral part of the leadership institute.

Students make friendships that last a lifetime. They have fun and are given an opportunity to experience things that can’t be taught in the classroom.  Nightly Talking Circles allow students time to share and exchange thoughts and feelings that are of utmost importance to them.

Exercise is imperative to maintaining a healthy mind and body, therefore, running and yoga are incorporated into each day’s agenda.

A concert by famed recording artist and American Idol finalist Charly Lowry was held in the American Indian Museum at Old Main.  When the concert ended students were given a walking tour of the museum.

 Kaya Littleturtle from the Lumbee Tribe shared song, dance, history, and entertained the students with captivating stories about native culture and their rich ancestral lineage to the land.

Students were greeted by Professor Dr. David Oxendine, from the School of Education.  Dr. Oxendine, is most noted for directing the outdoor drama “STRIKE AT THE WIND” the story of Lumbee legend Henry Berry Lowrie.  Dr. Oxendine volunteers his time during the week directing the students in theater, teaching them about Henry Berry Lowrie, his contribution to the Lumbee Nation and working with them to perform on stage the play “TO DIE GAME”.

The week’s culmination is a live on stage performance by the students acting out their assigned roles based on their work with Dr. Oxendine.  Parents, family, college students, staff, and the public are invited to enjoy the performance. Playbills are available for everyone in attendance.

 

 

 

 

        
Cumberland County Schools
2465 Gillespie Street • Fayetteville, NC 28306
910.678.2300
© Cumberland County Schools

Send questions or comments to Web Manager

Copyright/Privacy Notices and Disclaimers | Derecho de Propiedad Literaria/Avisos Privados y Renuncias